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The Lifeceram project obtains the first ceramic tiles made from ceramic wastes

5/21/2015:   Members of the LIFECERAM project, coordinated by the Instituto de Tecnología Cerámica (ITC) and co-funded by the European Commission through the LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance Programme, met at ITC to analyse the research progress, which has already yielded the first ceramic tiles whose body and glaze have been made using recycled materials.

  Lifeceram has enabled a sector study to be conducted to analyse the degree of raw materials reuse in the production process, the conclusion being drawn that it was possible to make ceramic tiles whose composition contained over 90% non-hazardous ceramic wastes. It is sought to achieve a zero level of waste.;

Lifeceram-Zero is a European project in the LIFE + category, coordinated by the Instituto de Tecnología Cerámica (ITC), with the participation of the Spanish Ceramic Tile Manufacturers’ Association (ASCER) and the companies Chumillas Tarongi, S.L., Keros, S.A., and Vernís, S.A.

On 21 May, during the project monitoring meeting, the progress made in the prospective elimination of ceramic wastes currently being treated at disposal sites was set out at ITC, as much of this waste could be reusable as raw materials in fabricating new products. Indeed, at this meeting, the first ceramic tiles made with such wastes, involving both the tile body and the glaze, both being made using recycled materials, were exhibited.

The investigation has reached this stage after thorough analysis of the results of a recent market survey of numerous ceramic tile manufacturing companies and information from an agreement made between the Spanish Ceramic Tile Manufacturers’ Association (ASCER) and the Valencia Regional Authority for environmental issues.

The results obtained have been used to classify the types of wastes generated in the sector. The potentially hazardous wastes have been identified and separated from the non-hazardous wastes, the origin and nature of each non-hazardous waste being labelled. The materials that might subsequently be valorisable in new ceramic products were then determined.

The Lifeceram team consequently concluded that the degree of materials reuse in the ceramic sector was already very high, and that the possibility of achieving zero (non-hazardous) waste in the ceramic process was close at hand. One such possibility would be the development of a new product for urban flooring, which could contain wastes that had not been valorisable to date, this being a further key Lifeceram objective.

Lifeceram-Zero Waste is co-funded by the European Commission through the LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance Programme.

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